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Hay Que Pensar




I’ve reached the point where I won’t call my mom for two days and she won’t think I’m dead. Missing strides out here, man


Take me back to spring break

Take me back to spring break


1 note | Reblog | 4 days ago
theatlantic:

How Two Newspaper Reporters Helped Free an Innocent Man

During nearly 25 years as a reporter at the Chicago Tribune, I received hundreds of requests for help from convicted defendants. None was more compelling than the hand-printed letter from Daniel Taylor, a 25-year-old inmate at Stateville Penitentiary in Joliet, Illinois. In neat block letters, Daniel explained that he was serving a life sentence without parole for a double murder in Chicago in 1992. Even though Daniel had given a court-reported confession, he said he was innocent and he had police records that proved it.
The letter was addressed to Steve Mills, my reporting partner on numerous stories about wrongful conviction. When Steve brought it to my desk, I was as intrigued—and skeptical—as he was. Why had this man confessed? How had he been convicted? Was he delusional about what the police records really showed?
But Daniel’s timing was fortuitous. It was the summer of 2001, and Steve and I, along with fellow reporter Ken Armstrong, were deep into an investigation of false and coerced confessions in the city of Chicago. Perhaps, we thought, Daniel’s case would provide a window into a world we suspected—and later proved—existed: a world where defendants were said to have confessed to crimes they did not commit.
Read more. [Image courtesy of Maurice Possley]

theatlantic:

How Two Newspaper Reporters Helped Free an Innocent Man

During nearly 25 years as a reporter at the Chicago Tribune, I received hundreds of requests for help from convicted defendants. None was more compelling than the hand-printed letter from Daniel Taylor, a 25-year-old inmate at Stateville Penitentiary in Joliet, Illinois. In neat block letters, Daniel explained that he was serving a life sentence without parole for a double murder in Chicago in 1992. Even though Daniel had given a court-reported confession, he said he was innocent and he had police records that proved it.

The letter was addressed to Steve Mills, my reporting partner on numerous stories about wrongful conviction. When Steve brought it to my desk, I was as intrigued—and skeptical—as he was. Why had this man confessed? How had he been convicted? Was he delusional about what the police records really showed?

But Daniel’s timing was fortuitous. It was the summer of 2001, and Steve and I, along with fellow reporter Ken Armstrong, were deep into an investigation of false and coerced confessions in the city of Chicago. Perhaps, we thought, Daniel’s case would provide a window into a world we suspected—and later proved—existed: a world where defendants were said to have confessed to crimes they did not commit.

Read more. [Image courtesy of Maurice Possley]


324 notes | Reblog | 5 days ago

Spring break in Ko Lanta,
Ko Ngai and Ko Phi Phi


Great day beach hopping

Great day beach hopping


Part of me is hoping that this security update turns into something because im down to leave Thailand…well im more so down for the program to be over and to have more time to travel. At this point, I’ve completed enough to still get credit for the semester.


All I wanna do is be back home in ny for the summer, but all forces are working against me. Philly is REALLY the last place I wanna be cause that would mean that I’d be taking summer classes. I just wanna enjoy the last summer of my college years, shit.


If it’s hard, you should probably go for it.


Worshipping in a cave at UMoong Village
(Supposedly) human bones
Sunset in Thailand, with Laos on the other side


"I’m not even gonna argue with you!"

-A girl that has been arguing for 30 minutes. (via senorhoudini)
3,074 notes | Reblog | 4 weeks ago
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